Touring England through FMV games

Video games have provided a much-needed escape for so many of us over the past year. While we’ve been stuck indoors during various lockdowns, we’ve been able to explore digital worlds both fictional and real from the comfort of our sofas.

Full-motion video (FMV) games have made a frequent appearance on my playlist and streams over the past few months and many of them were filmed here in the UK. D’Avekki Studios has created some of the best and I’ve followed them since completing The Infectious Madness of Doctor Dekker a few years ago. It was their next release, The Shapeshifting Detective, which introduced me to my favourite FMV actors: the awesome Rupert Booth and Anarosa Butler.

Titles like this gave me inspiration for celebrating English Tourism Week 2021. What better way to explore the country without travelling than through interactive movies? Unfortunately though, my research uncovered very little information about where filming took place. Titles such as ERICA by Flavorworks and Late Shift by CtrlMovie have either no Filming and Production section on their IMDb pages or one which isn’t particularly helpful. I did manage to track down some locations however, so let’s take a quick tour around England.

Great Budworth in Contradiction: Spot the Liar!

Billed as ‘the most picturesque village in Cheshire’, Great Budworth looks like a lovely place to visit for a quiet weekend (if you ignore the murder that Detective Jenks was sent there to investigate). The George & Dragon pub is a pretty Grade II listed building which we ended up visiting several times during our playthrough of Contradiction, although sadly didn’t stop for a drink at. Interesting fact: the telephone box our hero uses to call the police chief was transformed into a mini-library in 2011.

Sandwich in The Complex

I’ve not played The Complex yet myself so thank you to friend-of-the-blog Phil for letting me know about this one! It was filmed at Discovery Park in Sandwich, Kent, ‘a global leader for science and enterprise with world-class laboratories and exceptional office space’. It seems like the perfect place to film a game about the fallout after a bio-weapon attack on London and what the scientists do when they find themselves running out of both time and air in a locked-down lab… On second thought, do we really want to visit this place?

Shrewsbury in I Saw Black Clouds

I Saw Black Clouds isn’t the best FMV title I’ve ever played and I’d highly recommend that anyone thinking of playing it heeds the trigger warning included in its introduction. But the pub featured as one of the locations looks like a lot of fun! The ALB in Shrewsbury, Shropshire is a family-run cocktail bar and I wouldn’t mind trying their Bitch Juice or Bad Apple. For something completely different, check out the Shelton Hospital, the abandoned building where Kristina is stalked by something spooky.

Kelvedon Hatch in The Bunker

The Secret Nuclear Bunker in Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, is the setting for The Bunker. It was once a Regional Government HQ where a team was tasked to organise the survival of the population in the aftermath of a nuclear war but is now open to the public as a museum. I’ve visited this place several times in the past as my stepson was fascinated with it when he was younger; it has such a heavy atmosphere, just like the feeling you get when you play the game. Check out this post to see my photographs.

Monk Fryston in The Dark Side of the Moon

We had a lot of fun playing The Dark Side of the Moon in March and were surprised by the developer and his family when they joined us during our stream. Instead of immediately looking for the missing children in the most obvious places, our friends in Twitch chat demanded we always went ‘To The Crown!’ first. Monk Fryston looks like such a nice place for a weekend away – so much so that my other-half and I are planning a trip to Leeds later this year. Look out for another post at some point.

VisitEngland, the organisers of English Tourism Week, and developers seem to be missing a trick. FMV games are a great way to promote towns and villages around the country that many people might not otherwise have heard of, and encourage gamers to get outside and visit them now that lockdown is easing. Come on, creators: share the details on IMDb, Wikipedia or the official website for your project so we can check out these locations and start planning our weekends.

Do you know where other FMV releases were filmed? Or has a video game, FMV or otherwise, ever inspired you to visit a real-world location? Let us know in the comments below.

Strangeland: mind, monsters and metaphors

Last year wasn’t a great one for me personally in terms of gaming. My wishlist was bursting at the seams with upcoming releases I’m looking forward to playing, but many were delayed due to COVID-19 and challenges faced with remote working.

Things are beginning to look up though. Not only are lockdown restrictions now easing in the UK, postponements in the gaming world are coming to an end too and I’ve been able to get my hands on some great games recently. The Dark Side of the Moon was a fun full-motion video (FMV) title with a science-fiction storyline and I can’t wait for the sequel; and Hitchhiker took me on a mysterious journey into the unknown which stayed with me for long after the credits rolled.

I jumped at the chance of a review key for Strangeland after being kindly contacted by Emily Morganti as I’ve enjoyed everything that Wadjet Eye Games has had a hand in creating or publishing. Adventure fans are likely to remember Wormwood Studios’ 2012 release Primordia, a well-received point-and-click set in a post-apocalyptic world where a robot wants to find out what happened to the humans. Now after ten years of work, we’re finally able to play its spiritual successor this month.

The story begins when you wake up on a rickety wooden bridge suspended in the sky with no memory of who you are or how you got there. In the distance is Strangeland, a nightmarish carnival filled with traps and riddles, where you witness a golden-haired woman fall down a bottomless well before you have a chance to save her. Somehow you know that until you destroy the Dark Thing lurking at the top of a towering rollercoaster, it will keep happening over and over again.

I don’t want to give too much away but it should be fairly obvious from this summary that it isn’t a game for children. As advised on its Steam page: “Strangeland deals with mature themes involving grief, mental illness, self-harm and self-destructiveness. It has some horrific but surreal imagery. Some players may find such content triggering.” While I wouldn’t necessarily say the title is scary, it certainly gives off a heavy atmosphere and there are some rather creepy moments.

For example: at one point you’ll find yourself trying to come up with a way to charm the eye out of a ten-legged teratoma, and at another you’ll have to discover the real name of a mermaid made by men. And lets not forget the ride to the edge of oblivion on the back of a giant cicada. Metaphors are liberally scattered through both the environments and conversations, and commentary is provided in an annotation mode for those interested hearing more about the references woven throughout the game.

Stramgeland, video game

Halfway through my playthrough, my other-half asked me whether I was enjoying Strangeland so far and I told him that I was because it reminded me of Sanitarium. It was therefore a nice surprise to come across an old post on the Steam news hub the following week, in which a member of Wormwood Studios discussed the game’s influences. They wrote: “We found inspiration in games like Sanitarium and Weird Dreams, shows and movies like The Prisoner and Eraserhead, religious and mythological works.”

A point-and-click is nothing without puzzles so let’s move on to those now. Like Primordia, those within Strangeland can be solved in several different ways and non-player characters (NPCs) remark on the actions you’ve decided to take. For example, one player might win a carnival game with good mouse skills and sharpshooting, while another might notice the electrical panel next to the machine and choose to make some changes to its engineering instead.

The carnival almost wraps back around onto itself as you progress and you’ll be placed in situations similar to those you’ve already experienced. For instance, early on you’ll have to figure a way around a vicious dog; then later, you’ll come across the beast again – but this time it has your face and you’ll need to tweak your previous solution. It’s an excellent way of reminding the player that unless the protagonist can break out of the cycle, they’re doomed to keep repeating the same fate.

There’s no fear of getting stuck though. You can use the payphone found at the entrance of the carnival to make a call to the operator – who sounds strangely like the protagonist – for a nudge in the right direction at any time up until the final section of the game. I made use of this feature twice and was pleased both times because, rather than being cryptic clues, the hints given were direct yet succinct. This meant I could move on without becoming frustrated or the storyline being spoiled.

It’s not only the puzzle structure which is reminiscent of Primordia; it’s the visual style too. The setting for both titles may be very different but the graphics show off the same retro-styled pixelated art in a muted palette. It’s easy to tell that Strangeland has been made by the same creators and you can see the influence of Wadjet Eye Games’ releases too. As mentioned above, there are a few creepy images featured during cutscenes but they aren’t overly gory and are more of a surreal nature.

This doesn’t mean that Strangeland is going to be a game for all adventure fans however, because I can see its subject matter deterring some players. I’d recommend being aware of the topics touched upon before starting and checking out the ‘mature content description’ on the Steam page. At no point are these handled in a gratuitous manner though, and many discoveries made by the protagonist are shared in metaphors so they’re somewhat open to individual interpretation.

What this title does brilliantly is present a cast of strange characters who speak in riddles. I usually don’t enjoy such conversations because I’m impatient and like straight answers; but there were enough clues given in each discussion to prevent frustration, yet enough obscurity to make every encounter feel mysterious and foreboding. At every moment during my five hours with Strangeland, I found myself wanting to progress to find out what had happened to the protagonist, yet fearful (in a good way) of where his journey would take him.

In their Steam news hub post, the developer wrote: “Strangeland began as a way for me to process the sadness I felt about [a personal situation]. What it means to watch the slow-motion destruction of someone you love, thinking you can save her, but not being able to.” That last line sums up the entire feeling of this release for me. You can feel that the teams’ personal stories have seeped into the storyline and it’s been a while since I experienced so much atmosphere within a point-and-click.

Strangeland is a game of mind, monsters and metaphors. It won’t be to everybody’s taste, but I can’t wait to see what Wormwood Studios come up with next.

Lucy Dreaming: dreaming big on Kickstarter

If you’re a point-and-click fan, it’s highly likely it was a LucasArts’ game which introduced you to the genre. This was the case for me and I’ve now played The Secret of Monkey Island so many times that I know the swordfighting-insults off my heart.

This explains why it’s almost guaranteed that whenever a new adventure appears on Kickstarter, it’s almost guaranteed that LucasArts’ releases will appear in the paragraph about the creator’s influences. It’s started to become a bit clichéd over the past few years and has caused me to think twice about backing certain projects. Perhaps I’m getting far too cynical in my old age but I can’t help feeling as though certain games are mentioned simply to secure pledges through nostalgia.

So why on earth did I decide to back Lucy Dreaming by Tall Story Games this month? The campaign page says it’s ‘influenced by classic 90s point-and-click adventure games’ and the promotional video features direct references to Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis and Day of the Tentacle among others. Although I’d read several positive articles about the project, I was unsure whether to give it my backing – until I played the demo for myself and saw something which made me change my mind.

In Lucy Dreaming, players will take a brave step into the terrifying world of suburban middle-class Britain to help Lucy unearth the secrets of her recurring nightmares. Her subconscious is a rabbit-hole laced with intrigue and a cast of extraordinary creatures, and you’ll need to discover the power of dream control so she can finally break the cycle. Do you have what it takes to communicate with her dysfunctional family, untangle her repressed memories and bring an end to the nightmares for once and for all?

The demo, available for download on the Steam page, sees Lucy explain that she has been reading about something called ‘lucid dreaming’. The problem is though that recently her anxiety is so bad that it’s preventing her from even getting to sleep. Fortunately though, some suggestions she found on the internet may help her get over this – so it’s time for a trip through her house to gather items such as soothing lights, firm head support and a warm drink.

After leaving the initial scene in her bedroom and heading out onto the landing, the protagonist can look at a pair of binoculars on a bookcase. If you try to pick them up, she says in response: “I don’t need them in this demo. Kinda makes you want to back the full game, doesn’t it?” And yes, it did. There was something about this line which was endearing and plenty more humour within the demo which aimed to break the fourth wall in the same way the LucasArts adventures did.

The puzzles are exactly what you’d expect from a point-and-click and you’ll normally need to complete several tasks to fulfil an objective. They’re all logical challenges though if you get yourself into that ‘adventure’ way of thinking. For example, Lucy needs to get hold of some feathers to refill her limp pillow. There’s an item somewhere in the house that will help if you could remove its plumage – but first you’ll need to find the object which will enable you to do that.

Fans of the genre will be pleased to hear that the interface is reminiscent of the 1990s classics and will instantly feel at home when they see the verbs shown at the bottom of the screen along with the inventory. The graphics will also transport you back to the gold old days of adventures as they have that lovely pixelated quality which feels so nostalgic. I may have gone into Lucy Dreaming being doubtful, but by the end of my 30-minutes with the demo I was sold on its humour and visuals.

It’s only Lucy’s home which is seen in the demo and the Kickstarter video advises that it contains no spoilers for the rest of the game. But it looks as if the full release will also be set in the land of dreams, as a blog post on the official website from last year shares that players will ‘learn how to influence the environment and characters that manifest while you’re dreaming to build up your confidence, unlock hidden memories and solve puzzles between dreams and the real world’.

The project reached its £15,000 target within the first week and at the time of writing, an additional £5,000 has been pledged so far. This means that the first stretch goal has been reached and all characters will now be fully voiced in the English version of the game. There are still a few more days to go before the end of the campaign on 26 May 2021 so there’s a chance that we could see a mobile version and translations into other languages when its released around May 2022.

Check out the demo on Steam if Lucy Dreaming seems like your cup of tea (well, I did say that Lucy was searching for a warm drink). You can also find more information on the Kickstarter page and follow Tall Story Games on Twitter.

Your wit’s got to be twice as sharp as your sword

“Swordfighting is kinda like making love. It’s not always what you do, but what you say.” Anyone who’s played The Secret of Monkey Island is likely to recognise this smooth line from Captain Smirk and be familiar with insult-swordfighting.

For May’s EXP Share collaboration, DanamesX over at Tales from the Backlog is asking everyone to share a gaming-related thing that they’re good at or proud of. For example, are you great at identifying voice-actors without looking at the credits, do you hold a record for a speedrun or have you 100% completed a video game series? It’s none of these things for me – but what I can do is remember every insult response from the first Monkey Island release.

As Smirk himself continues: “Any fool pirate can swing a sharp piece of metal around and hope to cut something but the pros, they know just when to cut their opponent with an insult, one that catches ‘em off guard. You see, kid, your wit’s got to be twice as sharp as your sword.” Wannabe pirate Guybrush Threepwood must complete the Three Trials to fulfil his dream of becoming a buccaneer, one of which is to defeat the mighty Sword Master – but as his mentor teaches him, it’s more than just how you handle your weapon.

Our hero must track down opponents on the roads of Mêlée Island and challenge them to a duel to improve his skills. Sometimes they’ll shout an insult he has never heard before and so he’s forced to reply with a poor ‘I am rubber, you are glue’ before losing ground. It’s not necessarily a negative thing though: it means he now has a new line to test out on his next rival and, if they manage to respond successfully, he can add another move to his insult-swordfighting repertoire.

These lines are legendary among adventure gamers. The most well-known is ‘You fight like a dairy farmer’ because it’s one of the first Guybrush learns, but other favourites include ‘I’ve spoken with apes more polite than you’ and ‘People fall at my feet when they see me coming’. Throw one at a true Monkey Island fan and they’ll immediately counter with the correct retort: ‘How appropriate, you fight like a cow’, ‘I’m glad to hear you attended your family reunion’ and ‘Even before they smell your breath?’.

The reason I love the insult-swordfighting mechanic so much is because of how well it fits into both the Monkey Island world and adventure genre as a whole. It’s believable to see pirates duelling on the roads of an island somewhere in the Caribbean and the lines used perfectly sum up the humour that runs through the entire series. It’s such a great way of adding a touch of excitement to a point-and-click without resorting to a horrible action sequence or tedious minigame.

The Secret of Monkey Island, video games, Guybrush, insult-swordfighting, pirates

LucasArts captured the cerebral nature of an adventure game along with the thrill of a classic movie battle while letting us express our inner swashbucklers. The formula is mixed up later in the game when Guybrush is finally good enough to take on the Sword Master; you can’t just use the lines and responses you’ve already heard in the same way and instead must consider what would be the best comeback to her challenges. ‘How appropriate, you fight like a cow’ becomes the flawless retort for ‘I will milk every drop of blood from your body’.

The mechanic makes a reappearance in The Curse of the Monkey Island but with a twist. As explained by Rene Rottingham after he boards Guybrush’s ship: “On the sea we fight it a little differently. On the sea, all your insults have to rhyme. So when I say ‘Every enemy I’ve met, I’ve annihilated!’, you say ‘With your breath, I’m sure they all suffocated.’” It also appears in Escape from Monkey Island – but our hero is utterly defeated when he doesn’t understand his opponent’s Australian-themed insults.

Regular Later Levels’ visitors will already be aware of just how much The Secret of Monkey Island means to me and how it introduced me to adventure games as a kid. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve played since then, most recently for its 30th anniversary in October last year, but I’ve spent enough time on the roads of Mêlée to be able to know right insult response off by heart. I’m not sure any other mechanic in a point-and-click has captured the attention of gamers as much or been so suited to its setting.

If you’d like to brush up on your skills, head over to the online insult-swordfighting game created by Karza. And by the way: soon you’ll be wearing my sword like a shish-kabob!

LudoNarraCon 2021: Lake

What’s this: a post about a title from this year’s LudoNarraCon which isn’t focused on being a detective? While Murder Mystery Machine and Song of Farca were about gathering evidence and tracking down criminals, this one offers an entirely different experience.

I wasn’t entirely sure Gamious’ project was going to be for me though while checking out the Steam page during the event at the end of April. The screenshots for Lake were pretty enough and I liked the idea of there being ‘no right or wrong answers’; but the description made it seem as though it could be, well, a little boring. After watching the trailer however and enjoying the way the narrator made the whole thing sound like an American television show, I decided to give the demo a try.

The story takes place in 1986 and begins when 40-something Meredith Weiss, a successful software developer, leaves the big city and returns to her quiet hometown of Providence Oaks in Oregon. She’s there to fill in as the local mail carrier for her dad for two weeks so this is quite a change of pace. It’s up to you to decide who she talks to, along with who to befriend or even start a relationship with, and at the end of her stint she’ll have to make up her mind: return to her job in the city or stay in the town she grew up in?

The setting is instantly recognisable as small-town America even to players who don’t live in the country. The shops dotted around Providence Oak, such as the General Store and Mo’s Diner, and wooden-cladded houses instantly make you think of television shows such as Dawson’s Creek or Gilmore Girls. Throw in some 80s nostalgia and an atmosphere which reminded me of something like Firewatch, and you’ve pretty summed up that trailer I mentioned earlier.

Chapters in Lake come in the form of days and each morning starts with a chat with your colleague Frank at the post office. He has already kindly loaded the van so you jump in and check your map, then stop at various addresses along a circular route around the lake to drop off letters and parcels. During my hour with the demo, the most ‘shocking’ things that happened were the song changing on the radio and some birds flapping overhead as I drove around a corner.

In some ways, the title isn’t that different to an RPG because it gives you a reason to travel to locations, complete a task and then return to your base. It’s this for this reason that I couldn’t help thinking to myself: ‘This is like Grand Theft Auto but without the crime and violence.’ Funnily enough, lead writer Jos Bouman referred to Lake as ‘some sort of anti-GTA’ during an interview with The Escapist, saying: “We just want to have a game that makes the experience sincere and mature. And we don’t want macho bullshit.”

LudoNarraCon, Lake

It’s not just about delivering the post though. I struck up conversations with several interesting characters met during my day on the road and perhaps even started a few new friendships too. A parcel delivery to the video rental store resulted in owner Angie giving me a copy of The Postman Always Rings Twice; and there was a trip to Mr Mackey with sick cat Mortimer too. (Hopefully it’s just Meredith feeing him cupcakes again rather than something more serious.)

There are apparently around 20 people to meet and interact with, of different ages and backgrounds who, according to Bouman, ‘have made decisions or are about to make decisions in their life’. Not everyone is going to be friendly or happy though. The development team wanted to make a game which is true to life and so tried to include a whole range of personalities in their non-player characters (NPCs), all mixed up with moments of joy, humour and sincerity.

Your nights in Providence Oaks can vary depending on the relationships you build. I found myself in front of the television on my first evening and then watching that video borrowed from Angie on the next; and it seems as though you can decide to meet up with other people at different locations if you’ve made arrangements. This day-night cycle adds some variety to Lake and makes a nice change from delivering the mail, as well as giving the player a sense of progression.

Perhaps the best thing about Lake for me during the demo was just how well everything fits together. The 1986 setting is during a time before mobile phones and the technology which now pretty much rules every aspect of our lives; and a job as a mail carrier gives Meredith the perfect opportunity to meet so many people. It therefore means real conversations with people rather than emails and text messages, and the whole thing feels completely natural as a result.

Bouman said in The Escapist interview: “In Lake, one of the most important decisions you have to make in the end is – are you going to stay in the village and say goodbye to your career in the big city? Or are you going to decide that you want more out of life? You make decisions that feel best for you… There is no right or wrong ending.” Unfortunately I had to miss the end of the demo thanks to a family barbecue, but I’m eager to see more after completing through the first three days.

I remember playing Eastshade back in 2019 and not wanting to leave when I reached the end of the title. It was just such a calming experience: no violence, no chance of getting attacked in the woods, just a desire to get to know the people on the island and help them if I could. This is the same impression I got from the short time I’ve spent with Lake so far. I might not have thought it was going to be for me while reading the Steam page, but it was added to my wishlist immediately after the demo.

The game is due for release on PC this summer but, if you want to get your hands on it faster, it’s going to appear on Xbox a little earlier. Check out Gamious on Twitter for the latest details.

LudoNarraCon 2021: Song of Farca

Song of Farca first hit my radar during a previous Steam Game Festival. It was a demo I was keen to try out, being a detective game featuring a female protagonist, but unfortunately time got the better of me and I missed my chance before the end of the event.

Fortunately, Wooden Monkeys project made a reappearance at last month’s LudoNarraCon and so it was added to my priority list. And after completing the prologue around an hour later, it was added to my wishlist too. Although it felt more like a visual novel and less lifelike than the other detective title I’d checked out, Murder Mystery Machine, there was still enough investigation in the gameplay and intrigue in the narrative to make me sit up and pay attention.

The story takes place in the city of Farca, during a time where technology isn’t just a part of everyday life but has made some things impossible without it. IT corporations gradually gain more influence and have become a modern aristocracy which couldn’t care less about the law or mere mortals. The corrupt government and criminal organisations are still trying to resist the powerful corporations, but they know that their golden age is over and Farca entering a cyberpunk future.

Residents are left with no choice but to turn to private investigators to solve their problems. As detective Isabella Song, you must uncover the crimes that the police have turned a blind eye to due to pressure from the mafia. You’ll have the help of gadgets, a small army of drones and your intellect; and even being under house-arrest for becoming involved in a bar fight won’t stop you from doing your job. After all, it’s no problem for a hacker to get online and find what they need.

A client is already calling you with your first case at the start of the prologue. A prototype eTerrier was stolen from the CTO of ApportPlastik while it was being taken for a walk in a local park and his young daughter is now heartbroken. After finding out where the dog was last seen, you digitally head over to the location and do what you do best: hack into the security cameras to start your investigation, download as much information as you can and track down the criminals.

Several useful abilities are at your disposal. Accessing a camera allows you to interact with the objects within its view and jumping between them all will give you a complete top-down overview of an area. You might come across a drone or a cargo bot which will enable some movement within the location. There may also be computers or tablets to unlock, but you’ll need to first figure out a distraction if these items are being guarded by an employee or security guard.

For example: there’s a drone in the park but it’s blocked by two children who are misbehaving. Using the available cameras, you come across a fountain switch – what better way to attract the kids by turning on the water? This means the drone is then free to scan the area and turn on an alarm, alerting the guard and causing them to be drawn away from their office. Hacking into their computer there lets you access the CCTV footage and download the video so your investigation can continue.

This footage can be digitally enhanced through a simple visual puzzle to give you the face of a person, who can then be searched for on the internet and a profile created from the details uncovered. You can also see the plates of the van used to take the eTerrier, which can be analysed by your artificial intelligence (AI) Maurice to give you its current location. All of this information is added to your digital investigation board and it’s here that you can see all the links between the evidence.

Unlike the mind-map board in Murder Mystery Machine where it’s up to the player to make the connections, they’re automatically displayed for you. That doesn’t mean there isn’t any detective work involved though; sometimes you’ll need to call the people for whom you’ve gained contact numbers and see what you can get out of them. You might have to prove that they’re lying by showing them a particular item or make a conclusion based on what you already know to back them into a corner.

Your assumptions won’t always be correct however, and wrong answers could have consequences. You can only talk to people for as long as they wish to tolerate your presence and jumping to a wrong conclusion could result in them ending the conversation. Players will need to use their detective skills to rely on the facts and avoid falling for any lies told by the suspects, because your decisions will affect the course of the story and you’ll need to live with the outcome of your actions.

I’m not sure I sure much of this mechanic during the prologue but the Steam page advises that Isabella’s situation will become more complicated as the narrative progresses: “The stakes get higher, and the various plot strands come together to form a single story. The choices you make in investigations have important consequences to the plot. Do you convict the suspect that all the evidence is pointing to or dig deeper? What collateral damage will you leave behind you?”

While Murder Mystery Machine is a game based in reality, Song of Farca feels a little more story-based and futuristic; and where Isabella’s methods are reliant on technology rather than old-fashioned detective work, the gameplay feels more focused on the conversations you have with other characters. It’s still up to the player to lead the investigation though and find the evidence that will lead them to the correct suspect. It’s pleasing when you succeed in making a correct logical leap between clues or solve a visual puzzle.

Song of Farca is due to release this summer, so hopefully we won’t have long to wait to find out what Isabella has gotten herself involved in. Until then, give Wooden Monkeys a follow on Twitter to stay up-to-date on their progress.